Dump / Landfill
Palo Alto meets the Bay in an interesting collection of terminal sites. An active landfill for the city lies next to the wastewater treatment plant for the region, which discharges into the adjacent slough. When the runway for the local airport was built, the small yacht harbor’s drainage was...
This hazardous waste management site is among the largest and most notorious in the nation. The hazardous chemical incinerator on site burned the contaminated soil from Times Beach, Missouri, as well as PCBs and other chemicals from all over the nation. The Safety-Kleen company, the nations largest...
The only fully permitted commercial hazardous waste dump in Ohio is located across the river from Toledo, in the industrial and farming community of Oregon. The site consists of hundreds of acres of grass-covered mounds and waste-handling sheds. It is one of the only commercial hazardous waste...
For thirty years, a 365 square mile area around the Farallon Islands served as the nation's primary nuclear waste dumping ground. From 1945 to 1970, when nuclear dumping at sea was prohibited, an estimated 47,500 barrels of radioactive debris from nuclear labs such as Lawrence Livermore were dumped...
A chemical waste site with a capacity of 2,800,000 cubic yards, operated by Chemical Waste Management, a subsidiary of waste giant WMX Technologies. One of less than 30 commercial chemical waste sites in the country.
The principal dump for New York City's garbage for over 50 years, Fresh Kills was the largest landfill in the world. 2,200 acres and a few hundred feet high, the dump received 14,000 tons per day, or 5 million tons per year, until it was shut down in 2001. It became the disposal site for the...
The Newby Landfill is one of the largest active dumps on the shores of the bay. It is the terminus for waste for all of San Jose, Milpitas and other cities. The 342 acre pile is still at least 30 feet from its permitted height of 120 feet, and has decades to go before it is scheduled to close. The...
This portion of Prima Deshecha Canyon, with ocean views above Capistrano Beach, is slowly being filled in with trash from the households and industries of Orange County. Though the two other major dumps in the county (at Sand Canyon and at Brea) currently receive more waste, they are running out of...
Mel Chin created and maintained this piece from 1990 to 1993. Surrounded by a square control area, a circular fence divides a portion of hazardous waste landfill into quadrants of plants (known as hyperaccumulators) that absorb and process metal from the ground. The plants then recycle this toxic...
The largest private landfill in the state, Roosevelt covers an area of 2,545 acres, has a 120 million ton capacity, and a 40 year expected trash-receiving life. Ninety-seven percent of the trash arrives in shipping containers, mostly via rail from the Seattle area, to an intermodal yard in...
One of the nation's six original low-level radioactive waste sites, Sheffield was opened in 1967, was filled to permitted capacity in 1978, and was subsequently closed. For much of its life it was operated by US Ecology, a division of American Ecology, which also operated the first commercial...
Between 1992 and 2001, as many as 45 train cars per day bought sewage sludge from New York City to this 129,000 acre West Texas property, where it is spread out on the ground like peanut butter. The waste site is a former resort called the Mile High Ranch, and is owned by a Long Island New York...
The West Contra Costa County Landfill in North Richmond is one of the largest and oldest continuously active landfills on the Bay. It serves communities all along the south shore of San Pablo Bay, from Crockett to parts of Berkeley. The pile, started as bay fill in 1952, is approaching its...