Nuclear / Radioactive
The National Museum of Nuclear Science and History is the new name for the National Atomic Museum. Before 9/11, the National Atomic Museum was located on Kirtland Air Force Base, and operated by Sandia National Lab. After a few years at a temporary location next to the Albuquerque Museum, it opened...
Uranium mill site, cleaned up by the DOE as part of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project. The mill operated from the 1930s to 1963. In 1942, the mill became one of two in the USA used to produce uranium for the Manhattan Project. Remediation operations left some radioactive...
The Nevada Test Site (NTS) is a 1,350 square miles (860,000 acres) restricted area in southern Nevada, owned and operated by the Department of Energy. It is a multi-use, open-air laboratory that was the primary location of the nuclear weapons testing program for the United States and the United...
Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station contains two boiling water reactors, with a combined generating capacity of 1,907MW.  Unit 1's initial license was issued in 1969, making it the oldest reactor currently operating in the U.S., while Unit 2's operating license was issued in 1987. Unit 1 draws...
Oak Ridge is a massive government laboratory complex and nuclear material processing plant constructed first during the Manhattan Project. Facilities constructed at the time included the largest building in the world, used to create a "mere" 100 pounds of Uranium 235 for the first few atomic bombs...
Former Union Carbide uranium mill site, now remediated. There are two former mill sites around Rifle, this, the Old Rifle site, which covers approximately 22 acres on the southeast side of town, and New Rifle site, which covers approximately 33 acres west of town, between the river and the...
A former uranium enrichment facility, the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) operated from 1952 until 2013, initially producing enriched uranium for military applications, before switching to the production of low-enriched uranium (U-235) for civilian nuclear power plants. While the 3,423-acre...
Palisades Nuclear Power Plant is located in Covert, Michigan, adjacent to Lake Michigan, the source of its cooling water. It is home to a single pressurized water reactor, possessing an output capacity of 805MW. Its operating license was issued in 1971, and it is owned and operated by Entergy...
Palo Verde Nuclear Power Plant is located in Wintersburg, Arizona, about 50 miles west of Phoenix. It's the largest producer of electricity from any source in the U.S., in addition to being the largest nuclear power plant in the U.S. as measured by total power output. In 2017 for example, Palo...
Originally the final assembly facility for the nation's nuclear weapons, Pantex is currently the nation's only nuclear weapons disassembly and plutonium storage site. An old WWII Army munitions plant, the facility was converted to nuclear device assembly in 1951, when it was taken over by the...
Currently the only nuclear power plant operating in Massachusetts, Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station is located a few miles down the coast from Plymouth Rock. Like many similar plants, it was constructed by Bechtel, and is powered by a General Electric reactor and generator. Built at a cost of $...
General Electric built the Pinellas Plant in 1956, which it then sold to the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (the precursor to the U.S. Department of Energy), in 1957. General Electric continued to operate the plant for the next 35 years, under government contract. The densely...
One of three major Department of Energy nuclear complex sites in Ohio, the Diffusion Plant enriched uranium for use as fuel in power plants, nuclear submarines, and nuclear weapons. High Enrichment Uranium operations ceased in 1991, and low enrichment for commercial power plant fuel continued until...
A nuclear fusion research lab, owned by the Department of Energy, and operated by Princeton University. Facilities include the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, the Princeton Beta Experiment, and the Current Drive Experiment. On 72 acres in Princeton.
Project Chariot was the code-name for a proposed excavation project, in which nuclear bombs would be used to build a harbor on the west coast of Alaska. It was part of the Plowshare Program, whose mandate was to develop non-military uses for nuclear technology. Although various preliminary...
For many years the largest uranium mill in the nation operated here, in the center of one of the largest uranium mining areas in the country. It operated from 1958 to 1985, though it continued to mine uranium from the groundwater inside the flooded mines until 2002. At its peak, the mill processed...
Rancho Secco Nuclear Power Plant hosted one 913MW reactor, and was owned and operated by the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD). It became operational in 1975, and over the course of its relatively brief lifespan, was prone to a number of safety and environmental problems, including but...
An underground nuclear test took place at this site in 1973, to investigate the possibility of using nuclear explosions to extract natural gas from low-permeability sandstone deposits. The test, called Rio Blanco - the last in the Plowshare Program - was performed by the Atomic Energy...
River Bend Nuclear Power Plant is located in St. Francisville, LA, adjacent to the Mississippi River, from which it draws its cooling water. It is home to a single boiling water reactor, whose output capacity is 967MW.  Its operating license was granted in 1985. It is operated by Entergy...
Tailings from a Western Nuclear uranium mine, currently undergoing clean-up as part of the Uranium Mill Tailings Remediation Act Project. The site covers approximately 170 acres. The tailings and debris were relocated to a UMETCO Title II disposal site in the nearby Gas Hills area.
Now officially a remediated wildlife refuge, Rocky Flats was one of the seven original primary nuclear weapons component facilities. The 6,550-acre site, 16 miles from downtown Denver, had a heavily industrialized 385-acre complex surrounded by a mostly undeveloped buffer zone. For over 30 years,...
An underground nuclear detonation took place at this site in 1969, to investigate the possibility of using nuclear explosions to extract natural gas from low grade deposits. The test, a Plowshare Program experiment called Project Rulison, was performed by the Atomic Energy Commission and two...
Two nuclear detonations performed in a subterranean salt dome formation in Mississippi, as part of a 1960's Atomic Energy Commission Test. The test program, called Project Dribble, called for creating an underground cavity using a nuclear bomb, then later detonating a second nuclear device, as well...
The San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS), between Los Angeles and San Diego, is one of two nuclear power plants directly on the west coast of the United States (the other is the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, in Central California). San Onofre is on a narrow strip of land between...
Located in Livermore, California, adjacent to the Lawrence Livermore National Lab Complex, this Sandia facility was established in 1956 to support Lawrence Livermore's nuclear testing program (Sandia Lab, based at Kirtland Air Force Base in New Mexico was established to take the nuclear explosive...
In the 1970's, the Washington Public Power Supply System (WPPSS, aka "whoops") began the largest nuclear power plant construction project in U.S. history: reactors 1, 2, and 4 at Hanford, and reactors 3 and 5 at Satsop, west of Olympia. As the budget swelled to $25 billion, and public opinion...
The Savannah River Site is a 310-square-mile Department of Energy (DOE) facility located on the South Carolina side of the Savannah River. It is one of the major nuclear materials processing plants in the United States, and is operated by the Westinghouse Company. The Savannah River Site (SRS) has...
Seneca is a munitions storage site in upstate New York, that is being cleaned up and converted to civilian use. The 11,000-acre base was an explosives, chemical weapons, and hazardous material supply depot, with 519 ammunition storage igloos and over 20 large warehouses. Weapons were also disposed...
One of the nation's six original low-level radioactive waste sites. Sheffield was opened in 1967, was filled to permitted capacity in 1978, and was subsequently closed. For much of its life it was operated by Nuclear Engineering Co. (which later became US Ecology, a subsidiary of American Ecology...
The first large-scale commercial nuclear power plant in the country opened in 1957, and was decommissioned in 1982. The reactor was taken to Hanford, Washington for disposal. The site is adjacent to a two reactor power plant built in 1976 and 1986, the Beaver Valley Power Plant, still operating on...