Water
The first major overland route to Alaska is 1,440 miles long, connecting the already existing road system from the lower 48 states (which went as far north as Dawson Creek, British Columbia), to Delta, Alaska (which was connected to much of Alaska through Fairbanks). Built in 1942, to move troops...
This 85-mile long canal brings water from the Colorado River to the citizens and agricultural industry of the Imperial Valley. The canal was completed in 1940, to replace a previous canal which served the same function, but traveled partly through Mexico (hence the name of the All American). The...
Located at the bottom of the San Francisco Bay, Alviso is an old port town with a dried up marina. Over a hundred years ago, Alviso was San Jose's shipping port, and after railways made the port less vital, it became a major cannery town. The Bayside Cannery, still standing, is said to have been...
The Arkansas Aeroplex was Eaker Air Force Base until 1992, home of a B-52 bomber wing and a refueling wing with around 4,000 workers. It is now a civilian airfield with some National Guard support activities.
A museum about the Arkansas River, and the multi-billion dollar waterway engineering project that opened the landlocked city of Tulsa up to commercial barge shipping. In 1971, the McClellan-Kerr Arkansas River Navigation System opened, composed of 450 miles of rivers, mostly the Arkansas, that...
Arrowhead Water, one of the largest bottled water brands in the western United States, has its original source here, just outside the gates of the Arrowhead resort, a large old vacant resort at the base of the San Bernardino Mountains. The source is a pipe that is used to fill tanker trucks, which...
Remnants from early and aborted construction attempts can be seen at the site of the proposed $1 billion Auburn Dam on the American River. This dam has been proposed in several forms since the 1950s; each time the proposed project failed to be executed. Construction even started on the dam in 1967...
In the 19th century, the Blackstone Canal linked central Massachusetts to the ocean through Providence, Rhode Island, stimulating industrial growth along its path. The river and canal system is now being converted into a heritage corridor, with bike paths and interpretive stations developing along...
Bonneville was the first of eight federal lock and dam structures built on the Columbia and Snake rivers, which are now the largest source of electricity on the continent. Construction began as part of the New Deal in 1933, and now energy production at this dam is over 1 million kilowatts, enough...
Several natural spring-fed pools have been altered to better accommodate scuba divers at this unusual commercial establishment in the desert. Some of the pools have been stocked with tropical fish, and the main pool is covered with a canopy and an enclosed suiting-up poolside area.
The California Aqueduct is one of three major aqueducts running through the desert of California. It is part of the State Water Project, which brings water to the south from the Sacramento River in the north. The aqueduct primarily serves the agricultural industry of the Central Valley, but is a...
Seven miles long and 540 feet wide, the Cape Cod Canal is one of the widest sea-level canals in the world. Construction started in 1909, and finished in 1914, and its width was almost doubled in the 1920's. The Canal transformed Cape Cod from a peninsula to an island, and lessened travel time for...
History is layered at the southwestern-most corner of the state, where an interpretive center (officially the Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center), sits atop an abandoned coastal battery, at the point where Lewis and Clark stood to view the Pacific at the end of their long journey, on the grounds...
"The world's only captive geyser" in downtown Soda Springs spews jets of water 100 feet in the air every hour, or every half hour during the tourist season. Similar to the famed Old Faithful and other geysers, the Soda Springs geyser erupts due to pressure created by the combination of carbon...
The salt operations at the southern end of the San Francisco Bay are the largest, in area, in the country. Cargill (a privately held industrial conglomerate with 85,000 employees worldwide) owns all the salt operations on the bay, having bought the bay area's main salt producer, Leslie Salt, in...
The Bay system is at its narrowest point at the western end of Carquinez Strait, a six mile long submerged canyon that separates San Pablo Bay from Suisun Bay. The Bay Area's bridges have many superlatives associated with them, and the Carquinez Bridge is no exception. It was called the highest...
The point of origin of the Central Arizona Project (CAP) is where the Granite Reef Aqueduct draws water from the Colorado River. CAP is a water supply system for the farms and cities of central Arizona, consisting of a 337-mile aqueduct that brings water from this point on Lake Havasu to Phoenix...
The town of Chatham has transformed its coastal perimeter to defend against the erosion, resulting from a 1987 storm, when the natural sand spit protecting Chatham from the waves, tides, and littoral drift of the Atlantic was suddenly and permanently breached. Since the last glacial bulldozer...
A bridge-tunnel structure extending 17.65 miles across Chesapeake Bay, which makes it the longest bridge-tunnel structure in the world, completed in 1964. In 1995, work began on a project to increase the two-lane roadway into four lanes, by way of constructing a second span parallel to the original...

A narrow 15-acre, manmade desert lake, Cheyenne was built especially for waterskiing, with boat turnaround islands on each end. Meant to be an aquatic track, Cheyenne Lake is one of several water ski and jet ski lakes in the Newberry Springs area, all of which are privately owned. The massive...
This mile-long federal dam on the Columbia is the second largest producer of hydropower in the nation, after the Grand Coulee. Unlike the other dams downstream, there is no fish ladder at this dam, finally stopping the most persistent salmon from migrating beyond this point.
Yerba Buena Island is used nearly entirely by the Coast Guard. At the high point of Yerba Buena Island is the traffic control center for all maritime vessels moving about the bay area. A Coast Guard building at the base of a tower houses radar displays with all vessels tagged and labeled on the...
Though the water is clean, this lake is heavily contaminated. It is popular among the recreational boaters who are no doubt mostly unaware of what lies under them. At the bottom of the 50-square-mile lake is 75 million metric tons of contaminated sediment (contaminated with lead, zinc and cadmium,...
One of the three major aqueduct systems that make Los Angeles possible. The aqueduct carries water 242 miles, from Lake Havasu, on the Colorado River, to Lake Matthews in western Riverside County, at the edge of the Great City. Built by the Metropolitan District Water Commission (MWD), the aqueduct...
Spanning the Delaware River, this 1,644-foot bridge is one of the longest cantilever bridges in the USA.
The source for the most popular bottled water brand in southern California is from this Crystal Geyser bottling plant adjacent to Owens Lake, a 100 square-mile lake that dried up after the construction of the first Los Angeles aqueduct. Crystal Geyser trucks drive the bottled water to Los Angeles...
America's longest and highest narrow gauge steam railroad, runs between Chama, New Mexico, and Antonito, Colorado, a distance of 64 miles through mountainous terrain, with elevations as high as 10,015 feet, at Cumbres Pass, Colorado. Built in 1880, to serve the silver mines of the San Juan...
Barstow Daggett Airport is located on a major aircraft travel corridor and is an important weather station and communication relay site. Most commercial aircraft flying in to Los Angeles begin to line up over Daggett, after homing in on the Daggett VOR antenna, located twelve miles away. From here...
The Dalton Highway is a dirt road 414 miles long, which follows the Trans-Alaskan Pipeline, for the portion between Prudhoe Bay and Fairbanks. Known as the Haul Road, it was built in 1974 to build the pipeline. The southern origin of the Dalton Highway, technically, is 84 miles north of Fairbanks...
Part of the water-supply system for New York City, the 13.5 foot diameter Delaware tunnel was completed in 1944 after seven years of construction. It connects the Rondout Reservoir, near Ellenville, to the Hillview Reservoir, in Yonkers. At 85 miles, it is said to be the longest tunnel in the world...