New York

Art Park was an important development site for emerging earth artists of the 1970's. Located on reclaimed land next to the Niagara River, near Lewiston, New York, the 200-acre state park had a well supported artist-in-residence program that began in 1974. The...

A diversified federal R&D lab, involved in energy research, biomedical research and environmental science research, and one of the major particle accelerator facilities in the country. Established after WWII, Brookhaven was founded as part of the...

Inside the anchorage of the Brooklyn side of the Brooklyn Bridge is a cavernous complex of eight 50-foot tall spaces. These cathedral-like rooms were walled off and used for storage for many years, until 1983, when an arts organization installed an exhibit...

CUBRC is a nonprofit organization that operates the Large Energy National Shock Tunnel (LENS) for the U.S. Government. The tunnel is used in high-velocity research, duplicating flight conditions on projectiles and weapons at speeds of up to Mach 15.

New York State's largest prison. Called "Little Siberia" due to its remote northern location, near the Canadian border. Opened in the late 1800's, this maximum security facility has housed some of the nation's most notorious mobsters, ax murderers, gangster...

Headquarters for the Corning Glass Company, a diversified manufacturing and R...

Part of the water-supply system for New York City, the 13.5 foot diameter Delaware tunnel was completed in 1944 after seven years of construction. It connects the Rondout Reservoir, near Ellenville, to the Hillview Reservoir, in Yonkers. At 85 miles, it is...

Protruding from the trees on a hillside above the eastern shore of the Hudson River, visible from public roads, is a nearly 100 year old 45,000 square foot moorish castle that has never been finished, nor really been lived in (except by a caretaker). Evans...

A groundbreaking exhibit called "Earth Art" was held at the Andrew Dickson White Museum of Art at Cornell University in 1969, curated by Willoughby Sharp. Included in the exhibit were Hans Haacke, Neil Jenney, Richard Long, David Medalla, Robert Morris,...

A 107,265-acre base in upstate New York, home of light infantry mountain units, and used in the training of almost 80,000 troops a year. From 1986 to 1992, $1.3 billion in improvements were performed on the base, including new housing units and roads, to...

The principal dump for New York City's garbage for over 50 years, Fresh Kills was the largest landfill in the world. 2,200 acres and a few hundred feet high, the dump received 14,000 tons per day, or 5 million tons per year, until it was shut down in 2001. It...

This General Electric Plant, along with another, one mile downstream at Fort Edward, is the source of the PCBs that line the sediments of the Hudson River, making what some call the "largest Superfund Site in the Nation" (the watershed downstream of Butte,...

A developed tourist cave with a large main passageway, an underground lake offering rowboat rides, a wedding chapel and an elevator.

A Canadian crude oil pipeline that brings oil 1,775 miles from Edmonton, Alberta. 13 pumping stations along its course move approximately 8.3 million gallons a day of crude through this pipeline, the longest crude oil line in the world (though the Trans-...

Iron Mountain is one of the nations leading secure storage companies, specializing in off-site data storing and computer back-up systems for corporations. The company operates over 30 vault sites in the United States. The Rosendale storage site is located...

A natural gas pipeline that runs from the Canadian border (at Waddington, NY) to South Commack, on Long Island, supplying over 3 million homes, as well as industries and power stations, in six northeastern states with gas from western Canada. The company that...

Located in an unused corner of the massive Jamesville Quarry in upstate New York, this piece was never completed, and has been untouched since 1986. The environment surrounding the piece resembles the erosional canyons of the Southwest in form and scale, but...

A former grain silo has been converted into the world's largest kaleidoscope, part of the newly renovated Catskill Corners complex, designed to attract tourists. A projector at the apex of the 37-foot tall silo projects images, multiplied by a set of mirrors...

A 4,100-acre federal installation devoted to research into nuclear propulsion systems. Knolls designs and develops reactors used primarily in military submarines. Owned by the Department of Energy, and operated by Bechtel (formerly by  Lockheed Martin...

A naval nuclear R&D and training site, associated with the Department of Energy's nearby Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory. This site has four land-based prototype reactors, like those used in nuclear powered submarines, which are used for research into...

This steel plant was once one of the world’s largest, with 20,000 employees in 1940s. It opened in 1902, and closed in 1982, and is now a landscape of piles of different kinds of post-industrial earth, and partially demolished ruins. It officially became a...

The Lincoln Tunnel, dug beneath the Hudson River, connects New York City and New Jersey. The 2.5-mile-long tunnel was completed in 1937, and was the longest road tunnel in the country for many years.

The area of the notorious suburban community and school built on a toxic dump left by the Hooker Chemical Company, has now been largely resettled. The epicenter of the chemical contamination, however, is still toxic and visible, though it has been isolated...

The Malta Test Station is a 165-acre industrial R&D site surrounded by a wooded buffer zone in suburban Saratoga, established in 1945 by the U.S. Government for rocket engine and fuel testing, explosives testing, and atomic energy research. It has been...

A 710-acre chemical waste site with a capacity of 850,000 cubic yards, operated by Chemical Waste Management, a subsidiary of waste giant WMX Technologies. One of less than 30 commercial chemical waste sites of this magnitude in the country, and one of less...

Former military R&D location associated with alleged WWII invisibility research (the Philadelphia Experiment) and other activities. Major focus for "technological cover-up" conspiracy theorists. Many radar facilities remain on site, though the majority of...

One of the largest public works projects in the western hemisphere, the City Tunnel #3 project is a 55-year long project involving the construction of 64 miles of 24 foot diameter tunnel. Much of the tunnel is being built 800 feet below ground. When it is...

These towers hold the equipment that adjusts how much water flows over Niagara Falls. Beneath the towers are the valves that open and close the intake pipes which divert water from this point, a few miles upstream of the falls, through massive underground...

Nuclear power plant with two units (reactors) that generate over 1,700 megawatts. Suffered a blackout of its electrical systems in the control room in 1991, which prompted the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to close the plant down for a few weeks. Acquired...

The 120-meter and 90-meter ski jump towers loom above the trees near Lake Placid. Built for the 1980 winter Olympics, earlier and smaller ski jump facilities have existed on this site since 1918. Ski jumping practice takes place year-round. A jump cycle, from...