Contact the Center

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810 CLUI Main Office:
The Center for Land Use Interpretation
9331 Venice Blvd.
Culver City, CA 90232

Phone and Fax (310) 839-5722

Please direct all inquiries about other CLUI facilities through the main office.

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VORs of Texas

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VOR (Very high frequency Omnidirectional Range) antennas are radio beacons, part of a nationwide network of navigational aids used by civil and military aviation. While their function is consistent, their shapes and coloration can vary, and their enigmatic forms hint to the all-too-unfamiliar parallel universe of communication technologies.

The Nellis Range Complex: Landscape of Conjecture

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864 The Nellis Range Complex is the largest restricted area in the USA. Within this Connecticut-sized hole in the otherwise open range of Nevada, are military landforms and activities that are only vaguely understood by outsiders. Among them are physical full-scale models of the anticipated battlescapes of other nations, which are linked to electronic warfare infrastructures that extend though thousands of square miles of restricted airspace, and into space.

Up River: Points of Interest on the Hudson from the Battery to Troy

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The Hudson River is a sculpted landscape, reflecting the collective culture that abides along its shores. It is more than a local river, it is a nationally superlative and progenerative place. The voice of the Hudson is that of the nation that was cradled in the history of this river - a nation that matured along its banks and which has risen up mightily in the Empire State. It is the source of romantic landscape imagery, as 19th century painters gazed across it, into the setting sun, imagining the Eden of a new America.

Model of Decay: The Chesapeake Bay Hydraulic Model

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Left abandoned and crumbling, in a warehouse in Matapeake Maryland (until it was totally destroyed in 2006), lay a unique vestige of terrestrial modeling heroics: The Army Corps of Engineers' Chesapeake Bay Hydraulic Model. Covering eight acres, the model was a hand-made landscape in miniature, built to mimic the massive estuary which lies a few hundred yards beyond the warehouse doors.

On Locations: Places as Sets in the Landscape of Los Angeles

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The identity of Los Angeles has always been composed of a blend of film myth and historical myth, and their alleged counterparts in reality. Some say that all of Los Angeles is a film set, and indeed it is hard to drive across the city without spotting one of those distinctive-looking production trucks, or those day-glo production signs that point the way to active locations and base camps, like some kind of cryptic treasure hunt.

Proximity Issue: The Barricades of the Federal District

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“I can tell you it’s a proximity issue...Beyond that, I can’t elaborate, for security reasons.”
- Lt. Dan Nichols, U.S. Capitol police, commenting on the closure of the steps of the Capitol building to the public.

Formations of Erasure: Earthworks and Entropy

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844 Robert Smithson’s Partially Buried Woodshed, now a mound of dirt in a wooded area on the Kent State University Campus, Ohio.The contemporary artform known as Earthworks is land art that is made mostly of in-situ earthen material. Works in this category comprise most of the major “iconic” examples from the late 1960s and early 1970s canon. Some of these works, like James Turell’s Roden Crater and Michael Heizer’s City Complex, have never been finished, while others, like Herbert Bayer’s Earth Mound, and Robert Morris’s Johnson Gravel Pit, are maintained by their owners in a state of stasis.

Subterranean Renovations: The Unique Architectural Spaces of Show Caves

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Like an elaborate stage for an audienceless performance, spectacular natural caves formed and transformed over the ages in the unseen world of the underground. When modern humans came into this subterranean world, first as explorers, then as tourists, they brought with them elements from their surficial realm, from cement and electricity to postcards and fried chicken.

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