Subterranean Renovations: The Unique Architectural Spaces of Show Caves

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Like an elaborate stage for an audienceless performance, spectacular natural caves formed and transformed over the ages in the unseen world of the underground. When modern humans came into this subterranean world, first as explorers, then as tourists, they brought with them elements from their surficial realm, from cement and electricity to postcards and fried chicken.

Christa Erickson

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Christa Erickson was a resident in 2000, and installed a camera that recorded a period of activity on the old Wendover airbase flightline, across from the Enola Gay Hangar.

http://emedia.art.sunysb.edu/christa/artist.html

Jennifer Odem and John Reed

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Jennifer Odem and John Reed were residents in 1997 and 1998. While in Wendover, they constructed several wind powered autonomous sculptures that roamed the salt flats.

www.jenniferodem.com

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Kelly Coyne

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Kelly Coyne was a resident in 1998. While in Wendover, she made several paintings on debris she found scattered about the landscape, then put them back where she found them for others to discover. She also constructed a model rocket equipped with a camera and made several photographs of the landscape. Her work was displayed in Wendover in 1998.

Alice Könitz

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Alice Könitz was a resident in 1997. While in Wendover, she worked with themes of desiccation, heat, and evaporation. She made several salt sculptures and transformed a camper trailer into a reflective light and heat space.

www.alicekonitz.com

Jeremy Kunkel

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Jeremy Kunkel was a resident in 1998. While in Wendover he constructed several camera obscuras on the edge of the bombing range. Observers could enter these light-tight booths and get a framed and composed view of the scene, cast onto back-lit fiberglass panels inside.

Jennifer Steensma

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Jennifer Steensma, a photographer from Michigan, was a resident in 1998. In Wendover, she photographed throughout the region, creating large color images that portray the built landscape as an abstraction composed of ambiguous forms of unknown intent.

James Harbison

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James Harbison was a resident in 1998. While in Wendover he amassed a large collection of scrap metal debris from all over the landscape, selecting pieces for their total qualities when struck. He further shaped and tuned selected pieces, mounted them on an armature, and eventually assembled the collection in a remote, outdoor location, as a distant, aural sculpture.

Simparch (Steve Badgett and Matthew Lynch)

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Simparch, a design and build team which includes Steve Badgett and Matthew Lynch, have been to Wendover on numerous occasions since first being awarded a residency in 1999. During their first residency, they rebuilt the interior of the Residence Support Unit building. In recent years, they expanded the footprint of the program by creating a remote and self-contained working environment at Southbase.

www.simparch.org

Great God Pan (Mark Sundeen and Erik R. Bluhm)

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Mark Sundeen and Erik R. Bluhm, the editors and principal writers of the journal Great God Pan, were residents in Wendover in 1999. While in Wendover, they researched and wrote new nonfiction about the area, which was later published in issue 14 of Great God Pan, a special issue of their journal entitled Salt Desert Tales.

www.greatgodpan.com/2006/03

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