Ikea Warehouse Grapevine

Ikea Warehouse Grapevine
Ikea built its largest distribution center in the US, a 1,725,000 square foot warehouse in this remote location, at the base of the Grapevine, at bottom end of the Central Valley of California, because it was on the interstate half way between the Bay Area’s urban sprawl and Southern California’s urban sprawl. Also, importantly, it was equidistant from the port of Los Angeles and the Port of Oakland, so the company could shift its deliveries between the two, as needed, as both were four hours away either way, a day’s round trip for a trucker

1 Infinite Loop Apple Campus

1 Infinite Loop Apple Campus
Apple’s former headquarters, at 1 Infinite Loop Road, is where the company made most of its leaps into global dominance, serving as the main campus of the company from 1993 to 2017. It is still owned and occupied by Apple

Apple Park

Apple Park
Apple’s new headquarters in Cupertino, the $5billion, Norman Foster-designed circular “infinite loop” replaced the company’s 1990s campus a mile away (which had the better address: # 1 Infinite Loop Road.) The new campus, on the site of a former Hewlett Packard campus, is called Apple Park. The circular main building, with a diameter larger than the Pentagon’s, is designed to house more than 12,000 Apple employees. The company employs more than 100,000 people globally, and is among the largest information technology companies in the World, especially when measured by revenue.

Wichita Aircraft Plant

Wichita Aircraft Plant
Air Force Plant Number 13 was the name for a Boeing bomber assembly plant in Wichita, Kansas, built during WWII to be further inland and out of range of enemy fire, unlike most of Boeing’s production near the coast in Washington State. The Wichita plant made hundreds of B-52s and B-29s, in a building with 2.7 million square feet, next to others that total that amount again. It continued to make Boeing aircraft and parts after the war. Boeing sold it to Spirit Aerosystems in 2005, and though whole bombers are not made there anymore, Spirit still makes aircraft subassemblies for military and civilian aircraft at the plant, for companies that include Boeing. It occupies the west side of the runways at McConnell Air Force Base.

Republic Airport

Republic Airport
This airport at the Long Island town of Farmingdale was the main production site for Republic Aviation, a major military aircraft manufacturer through 1965, and afterwards owned by Fairchild Aviation. P-47 Thunderbolt fighters were made here in WW2, and later F-84 Thunderjets, and F-105 Thunderchiefs. When Fairchild took over Republic, it made A-10 Thunderbolts, a popular tank-killer plane known as the Warthog, still in use today. The plant was once known as Air Force Plant 12, one of around 85 production sites designated as critical by the Air Force from the 1940s to the 1960s. Most of the plant site has been developed into big box retail. Then American Airpower Museum occupies one hangar, and focuses on WWII historic craft.

Hagerstown Airport

Hagerstown Airport
This small municipal airport was once a major military aircraft production site, known as Air Force Plant 11. It was the site of a Fairchild Aircraft factory, making training and transport planes during World War Two, and military transport planes after the war. It also was a manufacturing site for A-10 Thunderbolts, known as Warthogs and “tank killers,” until the 1980s. Over the years thousands of planes were built there. The largest remaining structure is an 800,000 square foot aircraft assembly building, used for other things now. The Sierra Nevada Corporation, a military and aerospace company, also has facilities at the airport

Northrop Grumman El Segundo Plant

Northrop Grumman El Segundo Plant
This former Douglas/Rockwell fighter jet plant, is now owned by Northrop Grumman, and has a 2,000 foot long building that makes aircraft, satellite, and missile components. It is part of a mile-long aerospace corridor, one of the most important aerospace and defense R&D and production sites in the nation, with LA Air Force Base, the Aerospace Corporation, Boeing, and Raytheon, all engaged in satellite and rocket work here in El Segundo, south of LAX.

On Targets: Dropping in on American Bombing Ranges

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5373 Eglin Air Force Range, Florida, Google Earth imageAn exhibit featuring images of bullseye targets at military training ranges around the USA.

ON DISPLAY AT CLUI LOS ANGELES FROM MARCH 30, 2018

This project is made possible in part by a grant from the City of Los Angeles Department of Cultural Affairs.
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Yearning for Zion Ranch

Yearning for Zion Ranch
This intentionally-built community, south of San Angelo, was constructed over just a few years, starting in 2003, and became home to a few hundred members of the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, who moved there from their state line community at Hilldale, Utah and Colorado City, Arizona. The 1,700-acre site is a self-contained village, with an amphitheater, meeting houses, school, power plant, sewage lagoons, houses, farm, and a temple. The polygamous sect soon attracted attention of child welfare agencies, and the site was first raided by law-enforcement in 2008. After legal battles, the State of Texas took possession of the property in 2014, and its remaining residents were evicted. The site remains empty, awaiting its future.

Village Farms Marfa Greenhouse

Village Farms Marfa Greenhouse
Village Farms operates some of the largest hydroponic greenhouse operations in the country at two nearby sites: here, at the Marfa Airport, and a few miles further up the road towards Fort Davis. These structures allow growers to grow tomatoes (and some cucumbers and peppers) in carefully managed conditions, without soil, by controlling temperature, irrigation, fertilizer, carbon dioxide levels, humidity, and light. Village Farms, the Canadian company that owns the operations here, has another set of hydroponic greenhouses near Vancouver. These structures are not immune to external conditions. A hail storm in 2012 severely damaged the structures, and closed operations for some time.
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