Wendover Report
From the CLUI Outpost in the Bonneville Basin
5670 Group visiting the CLUI in Wendover. CLUI photo
THE CENTER'S OUTPOST AT WENDOVER, Utah, on the shores of the Bonneville Basin, saw its usual stream of visitors, known and unknown, passing through, signing the guest books or not, as well as some long-term projects progressing in different ways. 
 
The Orientation Building remains open 24-7-365, with access information posted at the door. The Exhibit Hall across from it is no longer open all the time, as it is slowly having some new exhibits installed, after being “gutted” by the Center for Art+ Environment (in truth, the CLUI donated its Wendover Residence Program material to the CA+E archives, whose registrars came to collect it. Some of this material may find its way into exhibits at CA+E’s parent organization, the Nevada Museum of Art). 
 
Other recidivisitors include: the “towering” artist Rob Ray, who serviced the radio receiving tower at the Orientation Building and the visual observation tower at Main Base, and worked on the aural broadcasting sound tower at South Base; the 13 Black Cats crew, who came to shoot their film Straight Flush (which is screening at the Museum of Modern Art in New York in February) in the CLUI Special Projects space (one of the old barracks buildings); William Lamson’s Mineralogy installation continues to salinify nicely, and was visited by many of the groups passing through CLUI Wendover. 
 
CLUI personnel worked on video shoots and other documentation projects for future programming at and about the region. Classes coming through and staying for a bit included Land Arts of the American West from Texas Tech, which spent a week at CLUI working on creative projects in the region; Aurora Tang’s field class with Ian James from Otis College of Art and Design visited Wendover, as did her field class with Alexander Robinson from the University of Southern California; and Hikmet Loe’s class from Westminster College made its annual pilgrimage west from Salt Lake City. ♦